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Who Are the Gang of Six Senators? A Look at the 6 Senators Who Are Leading the Charge

Government & Politics

As President Obama looks for the nation to support his proposal to cut the US deficit, a group of U.S. Senators better known as the “Gang of Six” are making headlines for their solution to the U.S. debt ceiling crisis by proposing to cut the U.S. deficit by $3.7 trillion over the next ten years.   The “Gang of Six” is led by Democrat Mark Warner and Republican Saxby Chambliss and includes four members of the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform.  Below is a look at the members of the “Gang of Six”.

Who Are the “Gang of Six”?

Mark Warner is currently serving as the junior U.S. Senator from the Commonwealth of Virginia. He is a member of the Democratic Party and delivered the keynote address before the nation at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. In 2006, Mark Warner was widely expected to throw his name in the ring for the 2008 U.S presidential elections however he withdrew his name citing a desire to prevent disrupting his family life.  He is expected to become the state’s senior Senator when Jim Webb retires from the Senate in January 2013.

Dick Durbin is the senior U.S. Senator from Illinois and the Senate Majority Whip, the second highest position in the Democratic Party leadership in the Senate.  In 1996 he won election to the U.S. Senate by an unexpected 15-point margin and served as Senate Democratic Whip since 2005, and assumed his current title when the Democratic Party obtained a majority in 2007. As a member of the Democratic leadership, he has a record as one of the most liberal members of Congress.

Kent Conrad is the senior U.S. Senator from North Dakota. He is a member of the Democratic Party and was first elected to the Senate in 1986.  Kent Conrad is currently chairman of the Senate Budget Committee.  Earlier in the year, Kent Conrad announced that he would not run for re-election in 2012, but will instead retire.  He said in a statement that it was more important that “I spend my time and energy trying to focus on solving the nation’s budget woes than be distracted by another campaign.”

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Clarence Saxby Chambliss, Jr. is the senior U.S. Senator from Georgia.  As a member of the Republican Party, Clarence Saxby Chambliss, Jr. previously served as a U.S. Representative from 1995–2003. During his four terms in the House, Chambliss served on the United States House of Representatives Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and chaired the House Intelligence Subcommittee on Terrorism and Homeland Security, which oversaw investigations of the intelligence community after the September 11 terrorist attacks in 2001.  He has a conservative voting record in the Senate, although he has participated in some bipartisan legislation in the past.

Mike Crapo is the senior U.S. Senator from Idaho and a member of the Republican Party.  Mike Crapo was elected to Congress in 1992, representing Idaho’s 2nd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives. After three terms in the House he was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1998. He was re-elected with no Democratic opposition in the 2004 election, a rarity in the Senate. He was again re-elected in 2010.

Tom Coburn, M.D. is a member of the Republican Party and he currently serves as the junior U.S. Senator from Oklahoma. In the Senate, he is known as “Dr. No” for his tendency to place holds on and vote against bills he views as unconstitutional.  Tom Coburn was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1994 as part of the Republican Revolution. He upheld his campaign pledge to serve no more than three consecutive terms and did not run for re-election in 2000. In 2004, he returned to political office with a successful run for the U.S. Senate.  He is a fiscal and social conservative, known for his opposition to deficit spending and pork barrel projects, and for his leadership in the pro-life movement.

Comments on this Article: 6

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  1. Ellen Hunter says:

    Either I can’t count or you left one out! I see five, not six.

  2. Julia says:

    Heroes, all.

  3. WahSupDoc says:

    Let’s hope solutions from The Peoples Budget are getting in here… to cut SS, Medicare & Medicaid without bringing end to tax haven abuses, closing farm subsidy loopholes or cutting Pentagon spending by at least 25% is reckless abuse of power!! Majority of Americans, as evidenced by recent polls, want tax breaks for the ubber rich to end and they want war business funding to cease AND they don’t want vital programs that benefit women, children, veterans and elderly cut!! At the risk of sounding like a Tea Bagger, WHY AREN’T THEY LISTENING??!?

  4. SpendingProblem says:

    Unless social entitlement programs are restructured they WILL be completely bankrupt within a few short years. People that claim ANY cuts are “draconian” are just not willing to face the reality of the situation.

    Some like to point at defense spending, which is only a fraction of entitlement spending, and claim it is too much when defense spending is actually a constitutional responsibility of the Federal Government entitlement spending is not. It does not mean compassionate spending is without merit but real compassion would be getting our national finances in order or there will be HARD TIMES!

    Some also point at one billionaire hedge fund guy and claim taxes are too low for the rich. There are less than .01% or less than 140,000 Americans in the highest income earners. According to the IRS in 2008 the top .01% income started at $380K, not billions! there are more than 70,000,000 in the bottom 50% that pay no income tax. This includes people making up to $33K/yr. Yes, you can have a car, home, A/C, x-box and satelite TV and still be in the bottom 50% of income earners paying zero taxes. Even if you taxed the top 1% at 100% you still could not make a dent in the debt.

    America has a spending problem, not a taxing problem.

  5. diane kordick says:

    What about cutting the defense budget in half; lowering/abolishing farm subsidies; closing corporate tax loopholes; cleaning up the fraud to medicare/medicaid; I don’t like this proposal at all.

  6. John says:

    Warner, Durbin, Conrad, Chambliss, Crapo, Coburn that makes six Ellen.
    Heroes I believe are those risking or giving their lives to save others in danger like firemen rescuing people from burning buildings or policemen and soldiers taking a bullet or schrapnel in explosions. Good Samaritans becoming involved and helping another person in dangerous or unfortunate circumstances Julia.
    They are listening WhaSupDoc. But not to the people who actually elected them in good faith but listening to corporate ceo’s and big business tycoons who financed their campaigns.
    Social Entitlements may be a common misnomer SpendingProblem as FICA and State Workers Pensions like mine, a teacher in Illinois that pays and has paid into, 9.4% of every paycheck for the past 23 years, an insurance for the future. So restructuring really means changing the rules in the middle of, but in my case, toward the end of the game. in other words, let’s restructure it so it is another TAX. Yes there is a percentage abusing the system, what the percentage of those that are I don’t know. My guess about the same as the top 140,000 wage earners that wouldn’t make a dent as you say to raise their taxes and pay their fair share. My guess too is the cheats at the top cost taxpayers much mire than those enjoying the good life at $33,000 or less salaries. How about restructuring corporate welfare and their tax loopholes, and shipping work out of the country, $4,000,000,000 in subsidies to big oil that made 14 billion profit in one quarter approved by this congress. The list goes on.
    And Diane, you said much in with so little wording. Thank you all for at least caring enough to rant.

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