As consumers switch to digital for almost everything that would once have been a physical transaction, today’s children (and tomorrow’s workforce and entrepreneurs) will face an employment landscape that increasingly relies upon digital and technical skills. So it isn’t particularly surprising that whether kids should code as part of their mandatory education is a hot topic.

Research suggests that children aged between 2 and 12 spend around 17 hours each week in front of a screen of some sort, whether that’s a mobile, computer, tablet or TV. So perhaps that screen time could be put to productive use by getting your children engaged in fun learn-to-code resources. Here are 5 favorites:

Code Studio

Code studio for kids

Designed specifically for children, Code Studio has courses for children aged between 4 and 18. There are 20 hour courses as well as specially designed one hour code classes. Even better? Code Studio is completely free.

Tynker

Tynker is not a free resource, but is a very affordable $6 a month. There are some free resources on the site, but access to everything will cost. This is a platform used by teachers as well as parents and their children at home.

Tynker is designed for children aged 7 and up.

Scratch

A free resource designed for children aged 8 and over, Scratch lets kids code interactive stories and animations. By making it fun and as much about creativity as technology, Scratch is incredibly engaging for children and doesn’t cost a thing.

Thimble

Thimble is a Mozilla project aimed at those aged over 12. It lets them start a project from scratch and see progress live on the screen as they code, or lets them rework existing templates to create fun tools and projects. And it’s completely free!

The Foos Hour of Code

The Foos Hour of Code

The Foos Hour of Code is designed for children as young as 5, making it a great option for those with younger budding programmers just starting out. Being aimed at such a young audience, The Foos has done a great job at making coding engaging through a story led approach and it’s free!

Do your kids code?

My son isn’t even a year old yet, so he might be a little young to get started. But I’d be more than happy to encourage him down that route later if he enjoys it. What about you? Do your kids code?