If you’re one of the millions of people who watched The 56th Annual Grammy Awards on Sunday night, it was surely a night to remember.

From the epic opening performance by Beyoncé and Jay-Z, and watching Taylor Swift’s charming dance moves, to Pharrell Williams’ fashion choices, if you weren’t following or commenting about these and other happenings on Twitter, you missed out.

I’ll let you in on a little secret: I also missed out. However, I spent the better part of Monday reading about and reacting to Sunday night’s events. What really resonated with me, besides drooling over Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s performance – which was so utterly amazing – was the amount of Tweets about the Grammys and its attendees.

Watched by 28.5 million viewers, The 56th Annual Grammy Awards boasted its second largest audience since 1993. Now more than ever we are seeing the relationship between TV and social media, and Twitter is the social network of choice for social media engagement during television programs. The 140-character limit, trending topics, and its quick-moving feed is ideal to get the most out of any programming, especially one centered around celebrities and musical performance.

And as you can see below, according to Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings, The Grammys outperformed every other television program from the last week.

Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings Weekly

Here’s a breakdown of what each metric means:

  • Tweets – Tweets attributed to a linear TV episode.
  • Unique Authors – Unique Twitter accounts that sent at least one Tweet attributed to a specific TV episode.
  • Impressions – The number of times any Tweets attributed to a TV episode were seen.
  • Unique Audience – The total number of distinct Twitter accounts amassing at least one impression of one or more different Tweets attributed to a TV episode.

A slightly different number compared to Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings, according to Twitter’s blog, The Grammys generated 15.2 million Tweets during the East Coast broadcast.

GRAMMYSTWEETSLIGHTbigger_0
Source: Twitter

Real Time Marketing via Twitter

While there was a plethora of Tweets about Lorde, Beyoncé, and T-Swift, the most popular Tweet was from Arby’s to hip-hop artist Pharrell Williams, about his choice of headwear…

Hey @Pharrell, can we have our hat back? #GRAMMYs

— Arby’s (@Arbys) January 27, 2014

As of 10:44 am EST on January 28, 2014, this Tweet generated 83,044 re-tweets and 47,956 favorites, and the numbers continue to grow. And as it’s been reported by many, Arby’s Tweet has crushed the response of Oreo’s famous Super Bowl Blackout Tweet.

Power out? No problem. pic.twitter.com/dnQ7pOgC

— Oreo Cookie (@Oreo) February 4, 2013

Why is this? Why did this Tweet get the response it did? Honestly, I’m not sure, but it’s not because the Grammys had more Tweets, in fact, 2013’s Super Bowl saw 24.1 million Tweets. I am inclined to think that the response to Arby’s Tweet has to do in part with Twitter’s growing popularity in real time marketing. Hey, maybe people were anticipating a Tweet heard ‘round the world like Oreo’s Super Bowl Tweet.

Another explanation for the vast reach of Arby’s Tweet is Pharrell’s witty response. Or, it could be because of the topic of the Tweet. At the Grammys, fashion is almost as important as the awards, and apparently, Pharrell missed the bus with his choice of outfit… or did he?

Y’all tryna start a roast beef?