Kickstarter
Kickstarter

Next into the tank is Dave Cohen of Sunscreenr, seeking $800,000 for 10 percent equity.

Key Takeaways: Suncreenr on Shark Tank

1. Product Overview: Sunscreenr detects areas where sunscreen has worn off or missed application.

2. Functionality: The device shows dark areas covered with sunscreen and light areas that are unprotected.

3. Features: Sunscreenr is waterproof, portable, and includes a tripod/selfie screen mount.

4. Kickstarter Success: Raised $93,000 on Kickstarter, selling for $109.

5. Shark Concerns: Lori Greiner and Daymond John tested it but worried about image clarity.

6. Mark Cuban’s View: Believes diligent sunscreen use is more crucial and opts out.

7. Robert Herjavec’s Skepticism: Doesn’t trust the process and decides not to invest.

8. Kevin O’Leary’s Offer: $800,000 for 33.3% equity due to high valuation.

9. Counter Offers: Cohen counters at 25%, but O’Leary sticks to his original offer, which Cohen accepts.

10. Valuation Issues: Other Sharks found the valuation too high and declined to invest.

Sunscreenr Company Overview

Sunscreenr is a device that detects the spots where you may be missing sunscreen. The camera shows where on your body sunscreen has come off, whether it was from sweating, swimming or you happened to just miss a spot while applying.

According to their Kickstarter, after you apply sunscreen, simply “look through Sunscreenr to see dark areas that are covered with sunscreen. See light areas that are not covered.

The light areas are more vulnerable to sunburns, sunspots and other forms of sun damage.” It is both waterproof and portable and even includes a tripod/selfie screen mount.

Both Lori Greiner and Daymond John put it to the test, but Greiner worries that the camera will not give a clear enough image. Cohen says it becomes much clearer outside, where the UV rays are stronger.They raised $93,000 on Kickstarter. They are sold for $109 on their campaign page.

Mark Cuban says the problem lies in diligent sunscreen use because there’s no such thing as “a quick quick.” He believes he has no self-awareness and goes out. Robert Herjavec doesn’t buy the process either and goes out as well.

Kevin O’Leary offers $800,000 for 33.3 percent, given that the valuation is too high. John goes out, possibly making the decision a bit easier. Greiner says the valuation is too high as well and challenges Cohen to offer a better valuation. He increases to 20 percent and she declines. She doesn’t counter his new valuation and goes out.

He counters O’Leary at 25 percent, which he immediately rejects. Ultimately, he accepts the offer.

Each week on “Shark Tank,” budding entrepreneurs have the opportunity to pitch their emerging business to six multi-millionaire and billionaire investors, known as sharks: Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks; Daymond John, fashion mogul and founder of FUBU; Kevin O’Leary, self-proclaimed Mr. Wonderful and founder of O’Leary Financial Group; Barbara Corcoran, real estate maven; Lori Greiner, queen of QVC; and Robert Herjavec, technology guru and founder/CEO of the Herjavec Group. Venture capitalist Chris Sacca is also slated to appear as a guest shark this season.

“Shark Tank,” which is based on “Dragons’ Den,” is produced by Mark Burnett and first debuted in 2009. To date, the sharks have invested more than $87 million in various companies after engaging in numerous bidding wars and shark fights. A new episode airs each Friday at 9 p.m. on ABC.

Social Media Reacts to Sunscreenr’s Appearance on “Shark Tank”

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