Kohl’s has come under fire for marketing a “faux” fur coat that was made with real raccoon dog fur.

The false advertising was discovered by The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), after they purchased and tested one of the company’s men’s hooded parka’s from the R&O apparel line.

Kohl’s officials immediately reacted to the agencies consumer alert, pulling the jacket from its website. The faux fur parka was not available in Kohl’s stores.

In a corporate statement the company writes, “Kohl’s standard vendor terms require that all merchandise must be free of any real animal fur. Unless expressly authorized in writing by Kohl’s. No such authorization was given here.”  The statement also offers a sincere apology to customers, “We apologize to our customers who would not have otherwise purchased these parkas. Kohl’s will honor returns, no questions asked, for any customers who no longer wish to keep them.”

The Kohl’s website had sold less tan 100 of the coats before the real raccoon dog fur was discovered. The coat was also available at other retailers throughout the United States.

The story may have ended there under other circumstances, but this is not the first time Kohl’s has failed to detect real animal fur in their faux advertised products. Last year The Humane Society discovered a rabbit fur handbag that was being sold as “faux fur.”

What might be most odd about this weeks discovery, is the fact that faux fur is actually cheaper than Raccoon dog fur. The Raccoon fur is also of lower quality than fake materials.

Animal rights activists note that the Raccoon’s are skinned alive. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) revealed during the announcement that nearly half of all Raccoon dog fur is collected in China where the animal is indigenous.

If the company selling the item misrepresented the product, they will likely be found in direct violation of the Federal Trade Commission Act, which prohibits “unfair or deceptive acts or practices” in commerce. Kohl’s could also be found guilty of violating the Fur Products Labeling Act.

Here is the Kohl’s faux fur parka that sparked the controversy:

And here is the animal that was sacrificed to manufacture the $209.99 jacket:

Here is Kohl’s full statement regarding the faux fur coat controversy:

Kohl’s standard vendor terms require that all merchandise must be free of any real animal fur unless expressly authorized in writing by Kohl’s. No such authorization was given here. Once
aware that the product was made with real fur, Kohl’s immediately removed the product from our website.

The parkas in question were sold online only and were not exclusive to Kohl’s. Kohl’s has never held these items in our inventories, as they are directly shipped from the vendor to customers. Fewer than 100 of these parkas have been purchased through Kohl’s.

We apologize to our customers who would not have otherwise purchased these parkas. Kohl’s will honor returns, no questions asked, for any customers who no longer wish to keep them.

Do you think Kohl’s should be held accountable for the faux fur fiasco?