This time last year, we figured out how to bring four of our absolute favorite things together here on the Movoto Real Estate Blog: Real estate, math, building things, and video games.

We combined those elements to produce a calculator that tells you how many blocks from the Game Boy version of “Tetris” it would take to build your house. It was actually inspired by an earlier calculator we made based on one of our other big hobbies: LEGO. You put in your house size, and it spits out the number of LEGO bricks you’d need to replicate it.

Recently, while playing the “LEGO Movie” game, a thought occurred to us: How could we combine our LEGO obsession with video games and houses? The results are below: 15 of our past video game property evaluations calculated in terms of their LEGO composition, along with their “real world” prices and cost in LEGO bricks. We think it’s pretty cool, and we hope you agree.

1. Bowser’s Castle — Super Mario Bros. 3

Video Game Houses In LEGO
Number of LEGO Bricks: 306,247,937
Square Footage: 2,895
Property Value: $455,000
LEGO Building Cost: $30,624,794
This was our very first video game property evaluation, produced way back in 2012. We decided to go with Bowser’s base of operations from “Super Mario Bros. 3” rather than the first game simply because we’d spent so much more time trying to master it in our youths. Aw, who are we kidding, we’re still trying to perfect our speed run through that game. At least now we know we could build a life size version with “only” 306,247,937 LEGO bricks for a real challenge if we wanted—it’d just require a lot of actual gold coins.

2. Hyrule Castle — The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 230,994,170
Square Footage: 82,950
Property Value: $113,807,400
LEGO Building Cost: $23,099,417
Home of Princess Zelda and the seat of power for all of Hyrule, this palace of the classic N64 adventure was Ganondorf’s obsession. As it turns out, he could’ve just ordered $23 million in LEGO bricks and built his own. We wonder if pawning the Triforce would have covered that? Actually, if you have any good LEGO Triforce plans, send ‘em our way!

3. Spencer Mansion — Resident Evil

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 40,037,388
Square Footage: 10,125
Property Value: $1,751,625
LEGO Building Cost: $4,003,739
We know there’s an official LEGO haunted house set, but what we really want is a LEGO version of the mansion that served as the terrifying setting for the original “Resident Evil” on PlayStation. Maybe one of these days we’ll make an attempt to build a small-scale one, but if you’ve gone mad and want to construct a full-size copy it would require more than 40 million bricks. We guess if any of them got stuck together, you could call Jill, the master of unlocking…

4. Stormwind Keep — World of Warcraft

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 241,692,103
Square Footage: 47,219
Property Value: $10,293,472
LEGO Building Cost: $24,169,210
We’ve got a couple of recovering “WoW” addicts on staff here, so it seemed only natural that we figure out how big Stormwind Keep, the big human stronghold in the game, would be in real life. We determined that you’d have to horde about $24 million to afford the 241 million bricks needed to build it. That’s only 1,611,281 monthly “WoW” subscription payments, when you think about it.

5. Grommash Hold — World of Warcraft

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 40,537,201
Square Footage: 10,261
Property Value: $3,265,608
LEGO Building Cost: $4,053,720
After we did Stormwind Keep, we thought it only fair to value the Horde’s equivalent seat of power, Grommash Hold. We probably ticked off plenty of diehard orcs with our findings, specifically that it would only be worth about one-fifth of the price in the real world. Still, with a LEGO construction cost of more than $4 million (270,248 monthly payments of $15, for those keeping track), it’s nothing to snarl at.

6. Peach’s Castle — Super Mario 64

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 1,455,814,536
Square Footage: 453,060
Property Value: $950,972,940
LEGO Building Cost: $145,581,454
Mamma mia! This is, hands down, the absolute largest video game property we’ve valued so far at more than 453,000 square feet. As a result, its LEGO build number is similarly stratospheric, standing at nearly 1.5 billion bricks or $145 million dollars. Excuse us while we search for a warp pipe to a world where we’re all multi-billionaires.

7. Luigi’s Mansion — Luigi’s Mansion

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 33,361,050
Square Footage: 9,089
Property Value: $17,170,029
LEGO Building Cost: $3,336,105
Now here’s a “Mario” universe property you’d only need to be a multi-millionaire to build in plastic bricks. Although it’s run down and thoroughly spooky in the game of the same name, you could probably make a nicer (or at least more colorful) version of Luigi’s mansion out of LEGO—33,361,050 of the bricks, in fact, to the tune of $3,336,105.

8. Donkey Kong’s Tree House — Donkey Kong Country

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 4,975,520
Square Footage: 700
Property Value: $3,800
LEGO Building Cost: $497,552
Why not use the building under construction from the original “Donkey Kong”, you ask? Because we really like “Donkey Kong Country,” that’s why. Seriously, though, we’ll probably get to that structure at some point, but for now we know that DK’s treetop digs would require only about five million LEGO bricks to replicate, at a cost of $497,522 (that’s about 1,382,006 bananas, by the way).

9. Castlevania — Castlevania

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 54,029,624
Square Footage: 15,680
Property Value: $486,080
LEGO Building Cost: $5,402,962
When we value properties from two-dimensional games, we have to get kinda crafty. That’s why Dracula’s castle from “Castlevania” is only about 15,000 square feet—we pegged it at just a few feet deep on the 2.5D plane. Still, this tall, narrow structure would take about 54 million LEGO bricks to build and cost $5.4 million and change. That’s enough to buy around 540,000 one-pound porterhouse steaks for use in evicting ol’ Drac. Vampires hate them, right?

10. Ganon’s Castle — The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 123,514,080
Square Footage: 42,094
Property Value: $57,752,968
LEGO Building Cost: $12,351,408
Remember when we said Ganondorf was jealous of Zelda’s castle? Well, he ended up building his own palace on top of its grounds in a dark future. What a jerk, right? It turns out that his place was nowhere near as cool—or pricey. It’d only require about half the number of bricks to build at around half the cost, as well. Guess he shouldn’t have demo’d the princess’ place after all.

11. Wily Castle — Mega Man 2

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 434,615,913
Square Footage: 167,250
Property Value: $113,562,750
LEGO Building Cost: $43,461,591
Without a doubt, Wily Castle from “Mega Man 2” is still one of the toughest collections of levels we’ve ever completed. Fortunately, figuring out its LEGO count was much simpler. It would take a mega-sized order of nearly 435 million bricks and cost more than $43 million. You’d want to budget for constructing an army of Master Robots to build it, too.

12. Croft Manor — Tomb Raider

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 244,535,500
Square Footage: 75,000
Property Value: $43,200,000
LEGO Building Cost: $24,453,550
If there’s one character on this list who could actually afford to build a replica of their house out of LEGO bricks, it’s Lara Croft. This globetrotting adventuress would probably just dip into her cash on hand to purchase the 244,535,500 bricks needed at a cost of about $24 million. Then she’d probably get it destroyed (again) by rival treasure hunters after some priceless relic she’d found.

13. Michael De Santa’s House — Grand Theft Auto V

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 53,326,549
Square Footage: 13,741
Property Value: $18,174,379
LEGO Building Cost: $5,332,655
If there’s one character who’d rob a bank to afford a LEGO replica of their home, it’d be Michael De Santa. This “reformed” heist mastermind from the latest “Grand Theft Auto” has a lavish villa in the game’s equivalent of Beverly Hills. To recreate it, he’d need to steal about $5.3 million and launder it to purchase the 53,326,549 bricks required.

14. Franklin Clinton’s House — Grand Theft Auto V

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 28,034,511
Square Footage: 6,859
Property Value: $7,921,568
LEGO Building Cost: $2,803,451
The second “Grand Theft Auto V” anti-hero whose home we valued, Franklin Clinton would probably build himself a LEGO Truffade Adder to go with his replica house, seeing as he loves fast cars…and stealing them. We’re not sure how many bricks he’d need for his ride, but his modern hillside house would require 28 million and cost $2.8 million to build.

15. Trevor Phillips’ House — Grand Theft Auto V

Video Game Houses In LEGO

Number of LEGO Bricks: 4,314,002
Square Footage: 570
Property Value: $6,695
LEGO Building Cost: $431,400
We’ll end this with the smallest video game property we’ve valued so far: Trevor Phillips’ decrepit trailer home from “Grand Theft Auto V”. If you were actually going to build a life size version of this dump from LEGO bricks, you’d need to use some that’d been chewed up by a vacuum cleaner and yellowed by cigarette smoke for the full effect. At least it would be cheap ($431,400) and relatively simple (4.3 million pieces).

Building With a Different Kind of (Pixelated) Block

We had a great time revisiting our past video game evaluations for this piece, but the fun doesn’t stop there. As we said up top, we have a calculator that will tell you how many “Tetris” pieces it would take to build any size structure, but we also got super nerdy and made one that does the same with “Minecraft” blocks (and even tells you how many of each type you’d need).

Oh, and if you’ve got an idea for a future video game property evaluation you’d like to see, go ahead and drop it in the comments below—we might just pick it.

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