Success in B2B field marketing is largely about relationships—the ones you create with customers as well as the ones you build with your internal sales team.

Communication, connection, and information-sharing are not nice-to-haves; they’re critical to fueling field marketing sales enablement and meeting customer needs. In a way, they’re kind of like the holy grail of field marketing.

Yet, fostering a “one-team mindset” is not always easy to pull off, especially when communication protocols are non-existent, marketing materials are disorganized, and teams tend to naturally work in silos.

To help build a bridge of mutual support and camaraderie with your sales team, try these simple, powerful tips. Not only will you create more effortless, free-flowing communication, you will also make your sales team fall in love with you—and who doesn’t want that?

3 Secrets to Firing Up Field Marketing Sales and Building Team Connection

To take field marketing sales enablement to the next level, first examine what you do well and understand what you can improve on regarding your communication and work style. Doing a little self-evaluation helps you see what works with clients and figure out how to shift some of those positives into collaborating with internal folks.

When you’re done with that, here are three simple tips to help you build on that positive space.

1. Build Stronger Connections with Internal Allies

Having a few go-to folks you can count on just makes life easier. You know their areas of specialty, how they can help, and their work styles—all things that speed up the sharing of information and aid field marketing sales enablement.

Use personalization, collaboration, and a little face time to create a bond with allies on your internal team—just like you would with a customer.

2. Make It Easy for People to Find, Access, and Digest Your Field Marketing Content

As an expert in your “field,” you get an invaluable look into the hearts and minds of your customers.

Whether you’re working on regional accounts or putting together an event, the internal sales team needs to know how to communicate with you and/or share information with prospects who may want to schedule face time with you.

Provide marketing content and background materials to educate the sales team on what clients can expect, and where and how they can find it.

Make the content a cinch to locate, simple to read, and easy to share with the people who need it most. For example, will you be manually sharing documentation? Is it stored in a content repository or on a shared server? Also explain how local campaigns may tie in with national ones to offer even more benefits (and enticements) for customers.

3. Share What You Learn in the Field with Your Sales Team

The voice of the local customer and prospect is essential to filling in niche sales requests and providing what your customers need, so take good notes.

Better yet, get clear on the type of information to track—that way you can come back to your sales team offering useful insights that build the sales pipeline and expand customer knowledge. Feature this knowledge at the core of your marketing.

You know what customers want, which pitches land the most, and the types of marketing materials your sales team uses (or needs). Instead of hoarding all these goodies for yourself, offer them up to grow every aspect of the buyer’s journey. The unique information you provide can be the difference between closing a deal or losing it.

Using these simple tips to step up your game with field marketing sales enablement can have a big impact on the quality of your internal communications and overall company-wide sales numbers.

It’s time to move out of the silo mentality and remember that being on the road just makes you a mobile part of a team with unique and valuable insights to offer. Use your position to help empower the team to be better as a cohesive unit and increase the number of deals rolling through the door.