AP

The country has been abuzz with anticipation as to which woman will grace the new $10 bill. The U.S. Department of the Treasury recently announced that it’s booting Alexander Hamilton from the note and replacing him with a woman in history who “contributed to the development of democracy in the United States.” This would lead one to believe that we have many women to choose from. But Americans are getting creative with their nominations—throwing out figures from Beyoncé to the members of the U.S. national women’s soccer team.

If only people were so quick to throw out political role models as they do celebrities. But it’s not entirely their fault—though the 114th Congress counts more women than ever before (104 in the House and Senate), it still has a ways to go before the 20% female electoral body can truly be representative of the 51% female American population.

Though the majority of the lawmakers in the GOP-controlled Congress remain male, the major gains women have made over the last century shouldn’t be belittled. Using government records, data site InsideGov crunched the numbers to see the progression of women sent to Congress over time. This particular graph below shows the percentage and number of women sent to Congress in each state every year.

Click on the play button on the graph to see the numbers change from 1917 to 2015. You can switch from the percentage of people to the number by toggling the drop-down menu.

Women in Congress by State Over Time | InsideGov

Montana was the first state to take the plunge in 1917, when it elected Jeannette Rankin to serve in the House before women had even won the right to vote. Since then, all states except for Mississippi, Delaware and Vermont have sent at least one woman to Congress. California has sent the most over time (39 to date), followed by New York (27 to date), but New Hampshire currently has the highest percentage representing the state at 75%.

InsideGov also visualized the number of women in Congress by party and chamber to see where women have been more successful in breaking the glass ceiling.

Women in Congress by Chamber | InsideGov

Women in Congress by Party | InsideGov

Some states have been more successful in selecting female representatives than others. InsideGov ordered the following list of states from least to most congresswomen, using the percentage of total state representatives as a tiebreaker. See which states lead the country in gender diversity.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 1
Number of female representatives: 1
Percent of people sent to Congress from Wisconsin: 20%

Minnesota

Minnesota Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 1
Number of female representatives: 1
Percent of people sent to Congress from Minnesota: 20%

Maine

Maine Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 1
Number of female representatives: 1
Percent of people sent to Congress from Maine: 50%

Hawaii

Hawaii Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 1
Number of female representatives: 1
Percent of people sent to Congress from Hawaii: 50%

Tennessee

Tennessee Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 0
Number of female representatives: 2
Percent of people sent to Congress from Tennessee: 18%

Indiana

Indiana Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 0
Number of female representatives: 2
Percent of people sent to Congress from Indiana: 18%

Maryland

Tennessee Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 1
Number of female representatives: 1
Percent of people sent to Congress from Maryland: 20%

Alabama

Alabama Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 0
Number of female representatives: 2
Percent of people sent to Congress from Alabama: 22%

Arizona

Arizona Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 0
Number of female representatives: 3
Percent of people sent to Congress from Arizona: 27%

Connecticut

Connecticut Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 0
Number of female representatives: 2
Percent of people sent to Congress from Connecticut: 28%

Texas

Texas Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 0
Number of female representatives: 3
Percent of people sent to Congress from Texas: 7%

Ohio

Ohio Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 0
Number of female representatives: 3
Percent of people sent to Congress from Ohio: 16%

North Carolina

North Carolina Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 0
Number of female representatives: 3
Percent of people sent to Congress from North Carolina: 20%

Massachusetts

Massachusetts Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 1
Number of female representatives: 2
Percent of people sent to Congress from Massachusetts: 27%

Missouri

Missouri Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 1
Number of female representatives: 2
Percent of people sent to Congress from Missouri: 30%

New Hampshire

New Hampshire Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 2
Number of female representatives: 1
Percent of people sent to Congress from New Hampshire: 75%

Illinois

Illinois Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 0
Number of female representatives: 4
Percent of people sent to Congress from Illinois: 20%

Michigan

Michigan Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 1
Number of female representatives: 3
Percent of people sent to Congress from Michigan: 25%

Washington

Washington Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 2
Number of female representatives: 3
Percent of people sent to Congress from Washington: 41%

Florida

Florida Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 0
Number of female representatives: 7
Percent of people sent to Congress from Florida: 24%

New York

New York Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 1
Number of female representatives: 8
Percent of people sent to Congress from New York: 31%

California

California Congresswomen | InsideGov

Number of female senators: 2
Number of female representatives: 19
Percent of people sent to Congress from California: 38%

Research More Members of Congress on InsideGov