Klout - meh

There are two things that mostly define a brand – their reputation and their actions. Each are intrinsically tied to one another – your actions impact your reputation, and your reputation defines what action you need to take.

Get one wrong, and the other can follow suit pretty quickly, and make you look foolish – which is exactly what the so-called “Enterprise Engagement Alliance” looks like with their current outreach tactics for one of their books.

Check out this tweet from them.

EEA spam

Seems innocuous enough, right? They have a new book, and they ask a question regarding the topic in order to pique interest. Except, it’s not innocuous, as this grab from their stream shows.


[View the story “Enterprise “Engagement” Alliance Spam” on Storify]

While there might be slight differentiations in text, the result is the same – sandblasting out tweet after tweet after tweet, regardless of audience, interest, and accepted best practices for outreach today.

For an organization that claims to have engagement at the fore of their efforts, their Twitter feed sure goes against that premise, as shown by my attempt to reach out to them about their methods.

Enterprise spam

Instead of getting an answer, I simply got more of the same crappy spam blasting that makes me believe Enterprise Engagement Alliance represents not engagement, but everything that’s wrong about brands that just don’t “get” social media.

A Lesson in REAL Engagement and Outreach

Compare EEA’s approach to that of Gini Dietrich, and how she promoted her new book, Spin Sucks, and worked with her target audience to help her own the PR category on Amazon on launch day and continues to sit high in the rankings today.

The results speak for themselves.

Now, given, Gini’s a professional whose business is all about crafting the right message and best way to communicate that message, so you’d expect her to be a pro at this.

But that just makes the approach from EEA all the more disappointing – after all, this is an organization who has been quoted as being able to, “…someday rival advertising in scale.”

It just goes to prove, being bigger doesn’t mean being better – and saying one thing but doing the complete opposite simply erodes any belief that your business is up to the job of doing what the bio on your spam-laden feed says you can do.

image: Lamda Chi Alpha Fraternity