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Why You Need a Social Media Editor

Editors have long been the gatekeepers for publishing houses. People who can single-handedly write a successful future for the media house or can as easily guide the organization into oblivion. With all organizations becoming publishers, your business needs a guiding force that can write the success story for your organization.

Why You Need a Social Media Editor image Editor

Publishing content in various formats has become necessary to stay alive in consumers’ memory. However, good content can be easily lost in all the noise on the Internet. To stay fresh in your audience’s memory, you need to push content through various Web 2.0 channels such as YouTube, Social Media networks, and Podcasts. The Web 2.0 revolution has also changed the way businesses interact with customers. The communication model has moved from one-to-many to many-to-many.

This paradigm shift in how businesses interact with customers has increased the complexity involved in keeping a unified front when interacting with customers in the different phases from pre-sales to customer support. Here are some of the reasons why the many-to-many communication model is fraught with hazards, and why you need a social media editor to monitor your interactions in the virtual universe.

Avoid Inadvertent Social Media Mistakes

Social Media is a new beast and we need to think what to post many times to avoid a backlash from the social media community. Professional content writers, journalists, and columnists are often trained in avoiding biased language or making offensive statements. However, your employees, who may not be trained and sensitized about avoiding offensive words or biased language, can easily make these mistakes. Mistakes that, of course, are not mistakes to them.

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Other than these writing errors, people can push the wrong key and publish things that they may not really intend to publish. You can apologize, but as Shane Duffy – an Irish soccer player – found out when someone RTed from his phone, you are already in the eye of the social media storm.

A social media editor can correct these mistakes before the tweets, posts, or messages in any other form go public.

Maintain Hashtags

A hashtag is the cornerstone of a business’s conversation with the public on Twitter. With other networks now adopting the hashtag approach, it has become all the more important. The importance of hashtags is not what I wish to reinforce. The conversation can be consistent and meaningful only if the hashtags used by your business are consistent.

A recent study presented at the 29th ACM international conference on Design of communication found that people tend to float many different hashtags when discussing an event or a catastrophe, and that a consensus evolves gradually. Until that time, the conversation is split across different axes and people are conversing among themselves in multiple groups.

To ensure that your business’s dialogue with people is not lost or fragmented, your social media contributors need to use the right hashtags for the right purpose and without any spelling mistakes. An important message sent with a spelling error can be lost in the Twitter world and spell doom for your company.

The social media editor can maintain a style guide for hashtags that informs contributors of the appropriate usage. And as the message is reviewed, the social media editor can fix any errors to make sure that the message is not lost.

Ensure the Time is Right

Use of tools to automate certain tasks on social media is not a secret anymore. Most businesses use a combination of queuing messages and interacting in real-time with people on their social media accounts. However, a message queued in good faith yesterday can be a problem tomorrow.

For example, the NRA tweet that followed the Colorado Shootings couldn’t be any more ill-timed. But it is not only the context of the message that can get you in trouble. NBA player Brandon Jennings was fined for the timing of his message rather than the content.

If only . . . A social media editor could have easily taken care of the problem by ensuring that the messages going out were appropriate for the time and adhered to the rulebook.

Thwart Malicious Intent

Not everything is a mistake. People are people; they get angry, or just frustrated. The point is they lash out and you need to ensure that they don’t let out steam at your expense. Just as you walk out the person who leaves your organization to protect your data, it is important to immediately revoke their access to official social media accounts.

But can you be really sure that the person has nothing scheduled for the next week? A control mechanism such as the social media editor will help remove any intentional tweets scheduled to undermine your business.

Monitor Conversation

Talking to customers is often tricky. It was all right when this conversation mostly happened on the phone, but with social media, everything is public. As Zoe Barnes from House of Cards says, “These days when you are talking to one person, you are talking to thousand.” In such conditions, spotting a brewing customer discontent with a company representative and diffusing the tension becomes very important.

The channels of communication may change, but the solutions remain the same. One way to diffuse the tension is to get someone higher up the ladder to talk to the customer. Tools such as the LiveWorld’s moderation application allow moderators to escalate messages to the right person and facilitate communication.

Social Media is dynamic and engaging, but hasty implementation of social media solutions without appropriate control mechanisms can do more harm than benefits to your business. Having a social media editor on the team or designating additional responsibility to an existing team member can minimize the chances of social media mishaps. There was a time when some believed that even negative publicity was publicity, but with sentiment analysis applications not too far away, it is wise to keep that negative publicity at bay.

Comments on this Article: 1

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  1. Thank you Prasanna for mentioning LiveWorld. Your post has many useful advices.
    Virginie Glaenzer, VP Marketing @LiveWorld

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