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Google Android 4.4 To Be Named KitKat. Draws Mixed Responses On Social Media

Twenty hours ago, Sundar Pichai, the Head of Android division at Google, revealed that the next version of the company’s mobile operating system (OS) would be called as Android KitKat. His tweet has already been retweeted more than 3.5K times at the time of writing this article.

We now have over 1 Billion Android activations and hope this guy in front of the building keeps that momentum going pic.twitter.com/V0VovgmObl

— sundarpichai (@sundarpichai) September 3, 2013

With one billion Android activations now, the new name is still a talking point especially in the tech community due to its odd pairing. Rumor was that the new OS might be called Android Key Lime Pie sorted alphabetically after its predecessors. Android 1.5 was Cupcake, 1.6 was Donut, 2.0 was Eclair, 2.2 was Froyo, 2.3 was Gingerbread, 3.0 was Honeycomb, 4.0 was Ice Cream Sandwich. And Android 4.1, 4.2 and 4.3 have been called Jelly Bean.

Believing that their devices make people’s life sweet, Google decided to name the new Android version on KitKat, one of the chocolates that has been quite famous with the Android team from its early days. Android KitKat is likely to debut with the new Nexus phone in the coming months.

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Google Android 4.4 To Be Named KitKat. Draws Mixed Responses On Social Media image KitKat Facebook Page

Though the Internet giant Google, for the first time, has partnered with a confectionery brand, owned by global FMCG giant Nestle, it is apparently a like-for-like cross-promotion deal. So there has been no monetary transaction for the deal that was confirmed within a matter of twenty four hours, as stated by John Lagerling, director of Android global partnerships while talking to BBC.

It is being said that Nestle will ship more than 50 million specially branded KitKat bars in 19 countries including Australia, Brazil, Germany, India, Japan, Dubai, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States, to mark the release of Android KitKat. (I’m really excited to try one of these being an Android fan.)

The packs will lead the consumer to the Android KitKat site that will provide them an opportunity to win prizes including a limited number of Google Nexus 7 tablets, and credits to spend in Google Play. A small number of Android robot-shaped KitKat bars will be offered as prizes in select markets. I guess these would be like the one that is standing outside the Google HQ. Right now the site is open for countries like US, Canada and South Africa. Perhaps India will have to wait.

Social media buzz around Android KitKat

While an unofficial Android KitKat India developer and user Facebook page from India has been running ads to get more eyeballs, the official KitKat page has not been behind. The Facebook page that caters to more than 18M fans on the page updated the new development 21 hours ago. The Facebook update has got more than 560 shares and received 7K plus likes.

Both KitKat Global (Followers – 27K) and India (Followers – 425) Twitter page showed up the latest development in their design and tweets.

Proud to unwrap Android KITKAT – find out more at http://t.co/tmBKRLpFfO pic.twitter.com/8nps9vna8l

— KITKAT (@KITKAT) September 3, 2013

Also, #KitKat and #Android have been dominating the India Twitter trends since the start of the day. And as I write #Android stands at the top of the top ten list.

I like the new name and quite agree to KitKat “chief breaks officer” Christopher Catlin saying that Google got the perfect confectionery right the first time. Find out why KitKat 4.4 is “the best ever thing to happen to confectionery” in the video embedded below. Planned dig on Apple?

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