Free Webcast: Blogging in the Age of Modern Marketers – Learn More ›
Popular Today in Business: All Popular Articles

Management Tip: Setting Expectations with Your Team

Sales Management

Management Tip: Setting Expectations with Your Team image Setting Expectations with Your Team 200x141Setting expectations is one of the basic fundamentals of management; yet, many managers fail to do this very important step effectively. Setting expectations first requires planning. The more time you invest on the front end, the more effective your team will be when it is in operations mode. The second component of setting expectations requires communication skills. People cannot read your mind, so to get your team on the same page as you, you must communicate your expectations clearly, in a way they can be heard, and often several times before they become internalized by others. Unless you are experienced and well-practiced, these actions may seem counter-intuitive at first. But they work.

Provide Structure

Providing structure starts with defining a direction and setting clear boundaries. Your direction might come from your boss, your customers, your own vision for the future, or even from the collective wisdom of your team. However it comes about, it needs to be clearly articulated and spoken about often. It ensures you are all on the same page in terms of what needs to be accomplished.

Next, setting clear boundaries requires defining what is within the scope of work and what is not, what appropriate behavior is and what is not, and what productive work is and what is not. Sometimes this feels bossy; as if you are telling people what to do. But when people have guidelines within which to operate, they are actually more empowered to act, take initiative, and innovate.

Clarify Roles

Take a second look at job descriptions and job duties. Do they match the work that is actually being done? Are they an appropriate fit for the structure you have set?

Generally, you can expect a job description to accurately describe 50-75% of the role. The rest may require adaptability as needs arise and priorities shift.

Related Resources from B2C
» Free Webcast: Know Your Story, Understand Your Customer

Keep in mind job descriptions are the baseline minimum expectation. For those on your team seeking advancement, a career development conversation should focus on above and beyond.

Set Motivating Goals

It is incredibly important to get goals right. When goals support key initiatives and are aligned with the department or organization’s strategic goals, they have a lot of power to direct work almost effortlessly. And when work piles up, stress mounts, and we start to lose sight of how to prioritize, goals can refocus our efforts and help keep us on track.

To be motivating, goals should make a difference, be fairly urgent, have a measurable accomplishment tied to them, and sound challenging. There should be a visible difference between the success and failure of a goal, the timeframe for accomplishment should be shorter than one year, and the completion of the goal should evoke a sense of pride.

Give and Receive Feedback

Nobody is perfect; a conversation that includes two-way feedback is one of the best ways to ensure continued improvement, upward progress, and ultimately, better performance. Additionally, an honest conversation where you seek and accept feedback without defensiveness or excuses builds trust and your relationship with your team.

Management Tip: Setting Expectations with Your Team image 848126cf b7b7 4922 b498 f5dc7fadc1763

Management Tip: Setting Expectations with Your Team image fe619565 610d 410e a464 c15fe148898b4

Comments on this Article: 0

Add a Comment

Add a Comment:


Thank you for adding to the conversation!

Our comments are moderated. Your comment may not appear immediately.