Customer Delight Creates Employee Dilemma

Delight your customers.  Make them thrilled.  Make them walk away with a smile, inviting you to their house for dinner, wanting to call you back just to chat.  Make their day.  Hey, why not make their life!

Delight?  Really?

You are a customer service representative.  You should be able to do this.  You should be the ray of sunshine in every customer’s day.  You know, you’re the one person who can do something for your customer that years of counseling and therapy haven’t been able to do for them – delight them!

Unless you’re a hypnotist or someone holding a big check from the lottery company, this is probably unrealistic.

Delight v. Realism

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So what is realistic?  Go into conversations with your customer caring enough to listen.  Caring enough to ask questions.  Caring enough to determine their goals, identify their needs, resolve their concerns.

That’s realistic.  The ability to show empathy, to want to help, to show appreciation – that’s realistic.

The ability to sound and appear patient, to make eye contact, to nod, to be open to what the customer says, to not get defensive – that’s realistic.

The ability to take a simple customer request and not handle it in such a way as to create an upset customer – that’s realistic.

Be Realistic with Yourself

When you’re standing in front of a customer or talking with them on the phone or responding to an e-mail, “Customer Delight” is a great thought but it’s too big a goal for most people to achieve.  Don’t criticize yourself for not being able to have this impact on your customer.  Your purpose is to serve and retain; your purpose is not to be some human version of a winning lottery ticket.

Expect a lot of yourself in interacting with customers, but be realistic.  Listen, serve, empathize with, and care.

You’ll find that your being realistic with yourself leads to more comfort, more confidence, and more success in your customer conversations.

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