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The 7 Components of Complete Brand Strategy

Branding

The 7 Components of Complete Brand Strategy image The 7 Components of Complete Brand StrategyIf you don’t have a comprehensive brand strategy in place for your marketing efforts, chances are very good that you can sense something is already missing. When marketing efforts are begun without implementing a brand strategy, you hit a wall. At first it might not be obvious but after a while an astute marketing professional will be able to tell, as well as have the necessary skills to change that. This article will serve as a primer to having a comprehensive branding strategy that will sell products.

1. Your brand must fit your product. Despite what many people think, your brand is not your product, website, logo. Say the word “Apple” for example, and chances are good that you will think of computers and music equipment. That’s because Apple has a strong brand message and they keep that message on track to fit their company.

2. Consistency. Don’t allow your branding message to get diverted or splintered. In many cases, especially when there are several managers affecting the message, companies end up with different branding messages being sent out. This is confusing to everyone, especially your consumers. Keep yours a one brand company.

3. Emotional Appeal. Head logic doesn’t sell products; emotions sell products.

4. Reward Loyalty. Did you ever wonder why there is so much advertising directed at owners? The answer is obvious. Companies want to assure that buyers of their products made the right choice. In short, they’re rewarding loyalty on the part of their customers.

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5. Measurable. Make sure you are able to measure the success of your branding. If you can’t effectively measure what effect your efforts are having on your sales figures, your efforts are probably falling on deaf ears.

6. Flexibility. Regardless of how you measure the effects of your marketing efforts, if they’re not working make sure that you have the flexibility to change your approach as quickly as possible. Many managers have the approach “Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!” It might sound good, but chances are good that this attitude will leave you on a sinking ship. Find out why your efforts aren’t working and change it.

7. Mind Your Own Knitting. The old saying of Satchel Paige, “Don’t look back, someone might be gaining on you” holds true in marketing. And while it might be true that you should be aware of what your competitors are doing, don’t become so preoccupied with them that you lose sight of your own objectives. Learn from your competition, and then move… forward.

This article was written by Hayley Granton and Michael Myles. 

Comments on this Article: 2

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  1. Kelsey says:

    I think rewarding loyalty is so important here.

  2. Arun Singh says:

    Thanks for this great post. I think the most important is to touch your audience – feeling correct – whether you sell services or products, you want to help them with their issues.

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